Welcome

Publications by Hasaki and Martin

Eleni Hasaki and Stephanie Martin  published their research in an edited volume by E. Angliker and J. Tully, Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New Approaches and Discoveries (Oxford, 2018). Eleni Hasaki co-authored the chapter "Terracotta Statues from Ayia Irini, Kea: An Experimental Replication." Martin's chapter was entitled “Abandoning Akrotiri (Thera): A Comparative Model Approach to Relocation Strategies After Volcanic Eruptions.”

Publications by Hasaki and Martin

Eleni Hasaki and Stephanie Martin  published their research in an edited volume by E. Angliker and J. Tully, Cycladic Archaeology and Research: New Approaches and Discoveries (Oxford, 2018). Eleni Hasaki co-authored the chapter "Terracotta Statues from Ayia Irini, Kea: An Experimental Replication." Martin's chapter was entitled “Abandoning Akrotiri (Thera): A Comparative Model Approach to Relocation Strategies After Volcanic Eruptions.”

Schiffer Pottery Sale December 7 from 9AM-5PM



Our beloved colleague and LTT founder Dr. Michael Schiffer has graciously agreed to sell some of his wonderful creations to benefit the Louie and Frances-Fera Schiffer Scholarship, which provides funding for archaeology graduate students to present a poster or paper at a national meeting. 

 

All proceeds go to the scholarship fund but we would like to emphasize that any amount you contribute above the stated price is fully tax deductible as a charitable donation.

 

The sale will take place this ThursdayDec. 7, 2017, from 9AM-5PM in theLaboratory for Traditional Technology (Haury #125). Needless to say that his pots make wonderful Christmas presents.

Potter's Wheels in Ancient Greece

Eleni Hasaki: Potters' Wheels in Ancient Greece

An on-going study of the possibilities and limitations of a hand-operated potter's wheel. A number of professional potters have tested it and their times for completing various stages in the forming process have been recorded. For a UA story on this project click here 

LTT Global Engagement

LTT Global Engagement

Our students conduct research all across the globe focusing on cultures of different periods.

LTT Global Engagement

LTT Global Engagement

Our students conduct research all across the globe focusing on cultures of different periods.

LTT Resident Ceramics Instructor

For her second year now Tucson potter Cynthia Jones with extensive experience in teaching pottery-making of different techniques kindly volunteers her time and expertise at the LTT. This semester, Cynthia, with the help of Classics Graduate Student Kelly Moss, is working on replicas of ancient perfume vessels,called unguentaria. For Jones' bio click here

Lecture Series and Outreach

LTT is committed to community service and student engagement through an annual  schedule of lectures as well as through several occasions for open houses to showcase the students' class projects. Many activities are generously supported by the University of Arizona Dean of Students' Student Faculty Interaction Grant and through the Global Initiatives Visiting Scholar Fund.

Eurasian Iconography and Symbolic Uses of Animals

Katie MacFarland: To analyze the subregions of Iron Age (ca. 1000-100 BCE) central Eurasi, density distribution maps of Scythian, Saka, and Xiongnu artifacts with ungulate decoration (e.g., ram, cattle, deer, moose) will be combined with spatial data on location of sites, archaeometallurgical technologies, and the paleoenvironment (Ph.D. Thesis completed 2017).

Eurasian Iconography and Symbolic Uses of Animals

Katie MacFarland: To analyze the subregions of Iron Age (ca. 1000-100 BCE) central Eurasi, density distribution maps of Scythian, Saka, and Xiongnu artifacts with ungulate decoration (e.g., ram, cattle, deer, moose) will be combined with spatial data on location of sites, archaeometallurgical technologies, and the paleoenvironment (Ph.D. Thesis completed 2017).

Support LTT

Scope: The Laboratory for Traditional Technology focuses on the study  of traditional technologies (both in antiquity and in recent times) primarily through experimental archaeology. Major areas of research are ceramics and metallurgy. The lab has a fully-functioning ceramic studio as well as equipment for processing metallurgical samples. It houses graduate students as long-term interns and short-term visitors. Currently the lab offers ceramic instruction through the LTT Resident Ceramics Instructor and hosts a number of lectures throughout the academic year.

LTT Ceramics Instruction: Spring 2017 M: 11:00am-1:30pm and F: 1:00-3:00pm

History: The Laboratory for  Traditional Technology has a long and celebrated history at the School of Anthropology.  Professor Michael Brian Schiffer began in 1983 to collect equipment and write grant proposals for what would become, in 1984, the Laboratory for Traditional Technology. His goal was to enable  archaeology students, who previously lacked facilities, to carry out experiments and analyze materials. Prof. Schiffer together with James M. Skibo (Laboratory's Assistant Director until 1991), co-authored publications in ceramic technology and archaeological theory and method. A large number number of students have conducted research in the lab, as part of their Ph.D. research.  Beginning in 2013,  The Laboratory of Traditional Technology is managed by Profs. Hasaki, Killick, and Triadan continuing the focus on traditional technologies, and keeping the laboratory as a welcoming place for  UA students, faculty, and visiting scholars to conduct their research.